Cannabis and Grapevine Settings Now Available for the Apogee MC-100 Chlorophyll Concentration Meter

chlorophyll coefficients

Introducing our two new species-specific coefficients

Due to popular demand, the Apogee MC-100 Chlorophyll Concentration Meter now features specific cannabis and grapevine* settings in addition to the 20+ previously available species. This means users can now measure cannabis and grapevine leaf chlorophyll content with even higher accuracy than they could by using the general "generic" setting, which is available to measure other non-specified species. The new settings come preloaded on MC-100 units with serial #1390 and above and are easily added to older MC-100 units by following the instructions and video below.


The patented MC-100 reports actual chlorophyll amounts rather than giving arbitrary index units. It provides an alternative to destructive sampling techniques for determining chlorophyll concentration. The MC-100 is less time consuming and labor intensive, and allows for leaves to be measured and monitored over an entire growth cycle. It also allows for rapid replicate measurements of the same leaf, or rapid measurement of multiple leaves.


In addition to the generic species setting, specific coefficients available on the MC-100 include rice, wheat, soybean, barley, pepper, tomato, pea, kahlrabi, Waldman's Green lettuce, Buttercrunch lettuce, corn, sorghum, Quaking Aspen, European Birch, Paper Birch, Crimson King Maple, Norway Maple, Japanese Maple, Boxelder, Crab Apple, Purple Leaf Sand Cherry, lilac, Forsythi, and now Cannabis and Grapevine.


Apogee is currently working to add additional specific species to the meter over the next few months, so please watch for our announcements or check our website https://www.apogeeinstruments.com/chlorophyll-meter-support/#coefficients for updates.

Have questions? Contact Apogee Tech Support at techsupport@apogeeinstruments.com.

 

* Coefficients for grapevine were derived from data collected and supplied by Everard Edwards and Tarita Shiraishi Furlan, CSIRO Agriculture & Food.